What To Do In A Relationship That’s On The Verge Of A Breakup

Updated February 19, 2021

Introduction

If your relationship has been on the rocks lately, you may have started to ask yourself the question of "What to do in a relationship when you're not happy?" or "what to do in a relationship when you're bored." Many people had had thoughts like these when their relationships were going through a rough patch. Having these feelings is nothing to be ashamed of.

Source:pexels.com

Instead of feeling guilty, try to get to the bottom of what's causing the rift between you and your partner. Has one of your work schedules recently changed? Or is there a new stressor in the relationship that's causing you to feel unhappy or bored? In this article, we answer the hard questions about intimate relationships, including - "What to do in a relationship break," What to do when you're not happy," and "What to do in a relationship when schedules change.

What To Do In A Relationship Break

It's not uncommon for dating and married couples who have been having escalating issues for an extended period to consider taking a break. If you and your partner have decided to take a break from your relationship to give each other space, establish guidelines for what behaviors are acceptable or unacceptable during the period of separation.

Be honest with yourself (and your partner) about the reasons for taking a break. Do you or your partner feel like you need personal space? Are you interested in dating someone new? While it may seem hurtful to establish these

What To Do When You're Not Happy

Are you feeling unhappy with your relationship lately? If you're starting to wonder if you made the right decision in choosing your partner, you may begin to feel unhappy. This is especially true in cases where relationships have been having ongoing issues. You may start to feel like you and your partner may never be happy together.

The first thing that you should do when you're feeling unhappy is to ask yourself why? What changes or improvements do you feel would make you feel better? Once you start to understand the answers to these questions, you'll be on the road to self-discovery that will guide your next steps. Is your unhappiness due to an issue with yourself, or with your partner? When you take a moment to reflect, you may be surprised at the answer that comes up.

Source: pexels.com

What To Do In A Relationship When You're Bored

If you and your partner are feeling stuck in a rut, say so! Let your partner know how you're feeling, most likely they've been feeling the same way. Find a way to spice up your relationship by trying new things together. Visit places you've never been to or take a new route through your neighborhood. Many relationships get to the point of boredom when there are no breaks in the routine.

Child rearing and everyday adult responsibilities can affect how you feel about your relationship (and your life as a whole.) Spicing up your routine while making time for self-care will go a long way towards sparking new conversations with your partner and renewed interest in activities outside of the relationship.

What To Do In A Relationship When Schedules Change

Sudden or extreme schedule changes can shake up the foundation of even the most solid relationships. Both partners may be taken aback by the sudden or prolonged absence of their partner as they struggle to find new ways to fill the space. Managing schedule changes can be tricky. Both partners should sit down together to discuss realistic options for managing new schedules so that the relationship isn't left on the back burner.

Working spouses may feel stressed from the pressure of work and the added pressure of missing time with their partner or spouse. This can lead to internal frustration that may start to come up and cause problems in the relationship.

Source: pexels.com

On the other hand, partners who stay-at-home or work fewer hours than their busier spouse may begin to feel neglected if schedules change, and they aren't able to spend the time that they used to with their partners. Both issues can lead to a build-up of resentment in your relationship if left unaddressed. In cases like these, seeking the advice of a licensed professional is a great way to get help figuring out how to manage a schedule change.

Relationship Counseling Is The Next Step

When you find yourself at a loss for what to do next about the troubles that you've been having in your relationship, the next step is to enlist the help and support of a neutral third-party. Having a third-party, unbiased point of view can help you and your partner discover the real issues behind the relationship disconnection.

Relationship counselors and coaches can provide struggling couples with insights on the relationship from a professional perspective. Licensed counselors can also provide counseling and support for relationships that are plagued by issues of mental health that are often the root cause for relationships quickly going south.

Many people today are struggling with undiagnosed mental health-related conditions like depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and bipolar disorder (BPD) that can wreak havoc on relationships if left untreated. There are free and paid options for couples and individuals seeking relationship counseling and mental health-related services online. More serious issues and relationships complicated by mental health concerns should be addressed by a licensed and certified mental health professional.

How To Get Started With Relationship Counseling

A quick Google search will yield a variety of results for free relationship counseling hotlines and services. There are even websites like 7 Cups of Tea that provide access to free listeners 24-hours a day to help individuals and couples begin to sort out their relationship challenges.

Aside from free relationship counseling hotlines and free listener services like 7 Cups of Tea, there are also affordable subscription-based options for professional relationship counseling services like BetterHelp.com

BetterHelp provides individuals, couples, and families with professional counseling services provided by licensed and board-certified professionals. The platform gives clients 24-hour access to highly-educated and trained professionals. The following licensed and board-certified professionals have over 2500 hours of clinical practice in their respective disciplines.

Psychologists (Psy.D/Ph.D)

Marriage and Family Therapists (LMFT)

Clinical Social Workers (LCSW/LMSW)

Licensed Professional Counselors (LPC/LPCC)

Benefits Of Relationship Counseling Online

Individuals and couples are finding it beneficial to consult with online mental health professionals regarding key events and relationships in their lives. People not only take part in online therapy for life advice and guidance.

Source: goodfreephotos.com

They can also get treatment and support for chronic mental health issues like anxiety, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) that may be contributing to the negative outcomes in their lives. The following are examples of how individuals and couples benefit from relationship counseling online.

New Insights - Couples learn to understand each other's point of view with the guidance of a neutral third-party (the therapist). Therapists can quickly intervene when couples are on the road to a misunderstanding and offer new language and insights on how to address issues.

Communication Skills - Many couples don't have formal communication training skills and are doing the best they can. A therapist can teach couples key relationship communication skills that can help couples to learn the cooperative language of "we" instead of using the passive-aggressive communication skills that are common to failing relationships.

Individual Counseling - Individuals who are suffering from undiagnosed mental health issues may be surprised to learn that they are exhibiting symptoms of chronic mental illness that are having a detrimental effect on their relationships. This understanding places these individuals in a unique position to seek counseling and support for both their relationships and concurrent mental health disorder.

Community Support + Advocacy - There isn't a much bigger relief than finding out you're not alone. People who subscribe to mental health services online join a network of mental health advocates and awareness experts that can provide guidance, advice, advocacy, and support resources for living with mental illness.

Renewal Of Self And Relationships - Now that you've taken positive steps in improving the quality of your life, you feel renewed as the quality of the relationships in your life continuously improves. This sense of renewal doesn't end with your relationship. It carries over into everything you do - now that you understand that you do have the power to facilitate positive change in your own life.

Final Thoughts

We've helped you answer the question "What to do in a relationship that's on the verge of a breakup. Now that you have a new perspective, you can look at your situation from a completely different point of view. Does it still feel like your relationship needs to end - or are there other positive changes that you and your partner are willing to commit to?

Counseling is one way to get a third-party perspective before making permanent decisions for the temporary negative emotions that failing relationships can bring out. Give yourself and your relationship a chance. Get in contact with a licensed relationship therapy professional today.

 


Next Article

What Is Ambivalent Attachment? -- An Overview Of Attachment Styles In Adults
For Additional Help & Support With Your Concerns
Speak with a Licensed Counselor Today
This website is owned and operated by BetterHelp, who receives all fees associated with the platform.
The information on this page is not intended to be a substitution for diagnosis, treatment, or informed professional advice. You should not take any action or avoid taking any action without consulting with a qualified mental health professional. For more information, please read our terms of use.